10 things that happen when technology fails

MacBookPro

#1 You stop in your tracks… waiting expectantly for the glitch to fix itself… willing it to fix itself. When it doesn’t? See #2.

#2 You panic. Especially so if, after six years loyal service, your old trusty MacBook Pro gave up the ghost only a few weeks prior and the problem you’re encountering is with its brand new replacement.

#3 You quickly check the Apple forums to see if anyone else has experienced a similar problem and if so, whether there’s an easy fix. But no. Everyone says something different and you don’t want to risk making matters worse. It’s time to call on the experts.

#4 You thank your lucky stars that you took out the AppleCare Protection Plan for Mac, realising how little you know about the technology you literally depend upon to earn a living as Apple’s support team talk you through a series of fixes. ‘Press the power button then when you hear the chime hold down the p, r, alt and command buttons until you hear two more chimes.’ ‘Hit the power button while simultaneously holding the r button.’ ‘Re-start in safe mode and click recovery.’ You marvel at everyone’s patience – including your own.

#5 You count your blessings that you’re on holiday this week and don’t have the additional stress of missing deadlines, even though it is a bit of a sh*t way to spend a hard-earned holiday.

#6 Your hopes are raised and dashed with every failed fix. By day two you feel like crying – but don’t. Instead, you find yourself transferred up the ranks to a Senior Advisor and become strangely transfixed by the sight of his remote cursor moving around your screen as he tells you expertly and calmly where to click and what to drag or drop.

#7 After yet more unsuccessful fixes you start to question, only half-jokingly, whether the issue will be resolved in time for your return to work. It’s been three days already. Now you really feel like crying – but don’t.

#8 Only drastic measures are left and under the Advisor’s guidance you erase your entire hard drive, reinstalling everything from scratch. Everything. Operating system, applications, documents, music, photos, the lot. But still no joy. It’s day four and the machine remains buggy. Now you cry… out of frustration and fear of what being without your much-depended upon mac for lengthy repairs would mean for your business. Worse, you cry when on the phone to the Senior Advisor. (Not wholly unexpected given that you are on and off the phone to one another all day.)

#9 You end what has officially been the most fraught holiday ever with a brand new, just released MacBook Pro, even more feature-laden and powerful than your most recent model, thanks to the help of one Apple angel. ‘Angel’ being the best word for someone who restores your faith in customer service, the Apple brand and in the sheer goodness of some people.

#10 You still have no idea what caused the problem and why, whether it originated from faulty hardware or a corrupt application, installation or file, but just to be safe you will never again click, install, drag, drop, download or transfer without seriously considering whether you really need to. For now though, you have roughly 1.25 days left of holiday to go and enjoy…

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© Lesley Dougall Copywriting Limited and 10thingsby.com, 2013. Unauthorised reproduction of content is not permitted. To request permission, contact copywriter@lesleydougall.com

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